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Most Recent Air Quality Reports

The TCEQ and other monitoring entities maintain an extensive network of ambient air quality monitors in Corpus Christi, Houston, and Beaumont. In preparation for Hurricane Harvey, approximately 75 percent of the stationary air monitoring equipment in these areas was temporarily removed. As these monitors were re-established and began collecting data, the TCEQ provided daily air quality updates on this webpage.

Oct. 26, 2017

As of Oct. 25, all industrial activities have resumed their normal operations in the Houston and Corpus Christi regions. Almost all industrial activity has resumed in the Beaumont region. Because these activities have resumed and ambient air quality monitoring data has remained at typical levels, the TCEQ discontinued daily air quality reports after Oct. 25. Data will still be evaluated daily and an alert will be posted on this page if concentrations become elevated above a level of health concern.

Oct. 24, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly concentrations of VOCs, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors on Oct. 24. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

There were two low-level elevated 1-hour SO2 concentrations (11.6 and 11.3 ppb) at the monitor in downtown Beaumont on Oct. 24 from 7-8 am. All other hourly concentrations at this monitor and the monitors in Orange and Port Arthur were low and all measured SO2 concentrations were well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations measured on Oct. 24 at the monitors in Mauriceville and Port Arthur were consistent with concentrations measured on Oct. 23. A 24-hour average could not be calculated for the monitor in Hamshire due to ongoing equipment issues. The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the Mauriceville and Port Arthur monitors were below a level of health concern.

Peak 8-hour average ozone concentrations measured on Oct. 24 decreased or were consistent with concentrations measured on Oct. 23. These concentrations were low and typical for this area at this time of year.

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Oct. 23, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly concentrations of VOCs, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors on Oct. 23. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations were low for all monitors in the Beaumont, Orange, and Port Arthur areas on Oct. 23 and well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations slightly increased at the monitor in Mauriceville and stayed the same at the monitor in Port Arthur on Oct. 23 compared to Oct. 22. A 24-hour average could not be calculated for the monitor in Hamshire because of ongoing equipment issues. The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the Mauriceville and Port Arthur monitors were below a level of health concern.

Peak 8-hour average ozone concentrations measured on Oct. 23 slightly increased from concentrations measured on Oct. 22. These concentrations were still low and typical for this area at this time of year.

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Oct. 20-22, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly concentrations of VOCs, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors from Oct. 20-22. The peak 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration (9.61 ppb) measured at the monitor in Port Arthur on Oct. 22 was higher than recent values, but was still over 176 times lower than a level of potential health concern. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

In general, peak hourly SO2 concentrations were low for monitors in the Beaumont and Port Arthur areas from Oct. 20-22. There was one elevated 1-hour SO2 concentration (14.6 ppb) at the monitor in west Port Arthur on Oct. 22 at 1 am. All other hourly concentrations remained low at this monitor. Several low-level elevated hourly SO2 concentrations were measured at the monitor in Orange between 3 am on Oct. 21 and midnight on Oct. 22. The highest hourly peaks occurred at 9 am (35.1 ppb) and 11 pm (39.0 ppb) on Oct. 21 and midnight (35.5 ppb) on Oct. 22. Although elevated, these peak concentrations are still approximately half the level of the federal air quality standard and well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur and Mauriceville decreased each day from Oct. 20-22. The 24-hour average at the Hamshire monitor decreased on Oct. 20, but a 24-hour average could not be calculated for Oct. 21 or 22 because equipment issues led to missing data for more than half of the day. Measured 24-hour average concentrations at the Port Arthur and Mauriceville monitors were consistent with concentrations measured in October and well below a level of health concern.

Peak 8-hour average ozone concentrations measured from Oct. 20-22 slightly increased compared with concentrations measured on Oct. 19. All concentrations were low and typical for this area at this time of year.

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Oct. 19, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly concentrations of VOCs, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors on Oct. 19. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations were low for all monitors in the Beaumont, Orange, and Port Arthur areas on Oct. 19 and well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Hamshire and Port Arthur decreased on Oct. 19. The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentration at the monitor in Mauriceville increased on Oct. 19 due to low-level elevated hourly concentrations. The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at all 3 monitors were below a level of health concern.

Peak 8-hour average ozone concentrations measured on Oct. 19 decreased or were consistent with concentrations measured on Oct. 18. These concentrations were typical for this area at this time of year.

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Oct. 18, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly concentrations of VOCs remained consistently low at all three monitors from Oct. 18. The peak 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration (8.10 ppb) measured at the monitor in Nederland on Oct. 18 was higher than recent values, but was still over 200 times lower than a level of potential health concern. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations were low for all monitors in the Beaumont, Orange, and Port Arthur areas on Oct. 18. and well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitor in Hamshire increased on Oct. 18 due to smoke from the McFaddin Wildlife Refuge fire. Hourly PM2.5 concentrations were elevated beginning in the afternoon of Oct. 17 and throughout the early afternoon of Oct. 18, with peak hourly concentrations occurring around noon on Oct. 18. Although elevated, the Hamshire 24-hour average (20.1 µg/m3) was still below the level of the 24-hour national ambient air quality standard (35 µg/m3) and below a level of health concern. The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentration at the Port Arthur monitor had a lower-level increase above concentrations measured on Oct. 17. The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the Port Arthur and Mauriceville monitors were consistent with concentrations measured in October and were below a level of health concern.

Peak 8-hour average ozone concentrations measured on Oct. 18 increased at all monitors in the Beaumont region compared to measurements on Oct. 17. These concentrations were typical for this area at this time of year.

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Oct. 17, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly concentrations of VOCs, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors on Oct. 17. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations were low for all monitors in the Beaumont, Orange, and Port Arthur areas on Oct. 17. The monitor in west Port Arthur measured a peak 1-hour concentration of 15.4 ppb at midnight on Oct. 17. Other hourly SO2 concentrations were low for the rest of the day. All measured hourly SO2 concentrations at monitors in the Beaumont region were well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur and Hamshire increased on Oct. 17 compared to concentrations measured on Oct. 16. A 24-hour average could not be calculated for the PM2.5 data from the Mauriceville monitor because equipment issues led to missing data for more than half of the day. Hourly data from the morning of Oct. 17 were generally consistent with concentrations measured the previous day. Both measured 24-hour average concentrations were consistent with concentrations measured in October and well below a level of health concern.

Peak 8-hour average ozone concentrations measured on Oct. 17 slightly increased at all monitors in the Beaumont region compared to measurements on Oct. 16. These concentrations are still low and typical for this area at this time of year.

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Oct. 16, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly concentrations of VOCs remained consistently low at all three monitors from Oct. 13-15. The peak 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration (6.99 ppb) measured at the monitor in Port Arthur on Oct. 16 was higher than recent values, but was still over 240 times lower than a level of potential health concern. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations were low for all monitors in the Orange and Port Arthur areas on Oct. 16. The monitor in Beaumont measured a peak 1-hour concentration of 18.4 ppb at 6 pm on Oct. 16. Other hourly SO2 concentrations were low for the rest of the day. All measured hourly SO2 concentrations at monitors in the Beaumont region were well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur and Hamshire decreased on Oct. 16 compared to concentrations measured on Oct. 15. A 24-hour average could not be calculated for the PM2.5 data from the Mauriceville monitor because equipment issues led to missing data for more than half of the day. Hourly data from the morning of Oct. 16 were generally consistent with concentrations measured the previous day. Both measured 24-hour average concentrations were well below a level of health concern.

Peak 8-hour average ozone concentrations measured on Oct. 16 slightly increased at all monitors in the Beaumont region compared to measurements on Oct. 15. These concentrations are still low and typical for this area at this time of year.

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Oct. 13-15, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 4 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly concentrations of VOCs remained consistently low at all three monitors from Oct. 13-15. The peak 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration (12.3 ppb) measured at the monitor in Port Arthur on Oct. 15 was higher than recent values, but was still over 130 times lower than a level of potential health concern. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations were low for all monitors in the Beaumont and Port Arthur areas from Oct. 13-15. The monitor in the Orange area measured an elevated 1-hour concentration of 25.3 ppb on Oct. 14. All other hourly SO2 concentrations were low throughout the weekend. All measured hourly SO2 concentrations at monitors in the Beaumont region were well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire increased on Oct. 13 compared to concentrations measured on Oct. 12, then decreased on Oct. 14 and 15. All 24-hour average concentrations were well below a level of health concern.

Peak 8-hour average ozone concentrations decreased at all monitors in the Beaumont region over the weekend. These concentrations are typical for this area at this time of year.

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Oct. 12, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 4 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly concentrations of VOCs, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors on Oct. 11. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations were in the 5-7 ppb range for all monitors in the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange areas on Oct. 11. All measured hourly SO2 concentrations at monitors in the Beaumont region were low and well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire increased on Oct. 12 compared to concentrations measured on Oct. 11 due to increased hourly concentrations measured in the afternoon and evening. Although elevated, all 24-hour average concentrations were well below a level of health concern.

Peak 8-hour average ozone concentrations measured on Oct. 12 increased at all monitors in the Beaumont region compared to concentrations measured on Oct. 11. These concentrations were still within the range of 8-hour average concentrations typically measured in this area at this time of year.

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Oct. 11, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 4 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly concentrations of VOCs, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors on Oct. 11. The peak 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration (6.1 ppb) measured at the monitor in Port Arthur was higher than concentrations recently measured at the site, but more than 278 times lower than a level of potential health concern. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange areas remained very low on Oct. 11. The peak hourly SO2 concentration (7.5 ppb) measured at the Beaumont monitor was higher than the peak concentration measured on Oct. 10, but all measured hourly SO2 concentrations at monitors in the Beaumont region were low and well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur and Hamshire decreased on Oct. 11 compared to concentrations measured on Oct. 10. The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentration at the Mauriceville monitor slightly increased due to low-level increases in hourly concentrations. All 24-hour average concentrations were within the range of concentrations measured in Sept. and Oct. and were below a level of health concern.

There was a low-level increase in 8-hour average ozone concentrations measured on Oct. 11 at all monitors in the Beaumont region compared to concentrations measured on Oct. 10. These concentrations were low and well within the range of 8-hour average concentrations typically measured in this area at this time of year.

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Oct. 10, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations remained consistently low at all three monitors on Oct. 10. Hourly benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations remained very low. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange areas remained very low on Oct. 10. Measured hourly SO2 concentrations at all five monitors in the Beaumont region were well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire increased on Oct. 10 due to low-level increases in hourly concentrations. The highest increase was measured at the Port Arthur monitor, though the 24-hour average (15.8 µg/m3) was still within the range of concentrations measured in Sept. and Oct. All measured PM2.5 concentrations remained below concentrations of health concern.

There was a very slight increase in 8-hour average ozone concentrations measured on Oct. 10 at all monitors in the Beaumont region compared to concentrations measured on Oct. 9. These concentrations were low and typical for this area and time of year.

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Oct. 9, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 6 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations remained consistently low at all three monitors on Oct. 9. Hourly benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations, in particular, were very low. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange areas decreased on Oct. 9 compared to Oct. 8. Measured hourly SO2 concentrations at all five monitors in the Beaumont region remained well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire decreased on Oct. 9 compared to concentrations on Oct. 8. All measured PM2.5 concentrations remained below concentrations of health concern.

8-hour average ozone concentrations measured on Oct. 9 at all monitors in the Beaumont region decreased from concentrations measured on Oct. 8. These concentrations were typical for this area and time of year.

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Oct. 6-8, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 6 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations remained consistently low at all three monitors from Oct. 6-8. Hourly benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations, in particular, were very low. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont and Port Arthur areas remained very low from Oct. 6-8. There were two 1-hour peak SO2 concentrations (26.5 ppb measured at 2 pm on Oct. 6 and 23.2 ppb measured at 9 am on Oct. 7) at the monitor in Orange that were higher than the peak from Oct. 5. Hourly concentrations before and after these two hours, as well as all hourly concentrations on Oct. 8, were consistently very low. Measured hourly SO2 concentrations at all five monitors in the Beaumont region were well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire within the range of typical concentrations in this area and were below concentrations of health concern. The Mauriceville monitor measured 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations on Oct. 6 and 7 that were consistent with concentrations measured on Oct. 5. The 24-hour PM2.5 concentration on Oct. 8 decreased on Oct. 8. Compared to concentrations on Oct. 5, the 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations measured at the Hamshire monitor stayed the same on Oct. 6, increased on Oct. 7, then decreased on Oct. 8. The Port Arthur monitor measured an increase in 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations on Oct. 6, a decrease on Oct. 7, and an increase on Oct. 8. All monitored increases were small and due to low-level increases in hourly concentrations.

On Oct. 6, measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors in the Beaumont region were generally consistent with concentrations measured on Oct 5. Peak 8-hour average ozone concentrations decreased on Oct. 7, then slightly increased on Oct. 8. Due to equipment issues, no data were reported for the West Orange monitor on Oct. 8. Monitored concentrations at all other sites remained low and were typical for this area and time of year.

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Oct. 5, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations remained consistently low at all three monitors on Oct. 5. Hourly benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations, in particular, were very low. The monitor in Beaumont was down for maintenance for 7 hours on Oct. 5. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont and Port Arthur areas slightly increased on Oct. 5 compared to Oct. 4. The peak 1-hour SO2 concentration (20.3 ppb) at the monitor in Orange was higher than the peak from Oct. 4, but hourly concentrations were consistently low throughout the rest of the day. Measured hourly SO2 concentrations at all five monitors in the Beaumont region were well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire increased on Oct. 5 due to low-level increases in hourly concentrations. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were within the range of typical concentrations in this area and were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors in the Beaumont region remained low and were generally consistent with concentrations measured on Oct 4. These concentrations were typical for this area and time of year.

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Oct. 4, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 4 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors on Oct. 4. The monitor in Beaumont was down for maintenance for 7 hours on Oct. 4. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange areas decreased on Oct. 4 compared to Oct. 3. The peak 1-hour SO2 concentration of 16.5 ppb at the monitor in Orange was measured at 10 am. Hourly SO2 concentrations were consistently low throughout the rest of the day. Measured hourly SO2 concentrations at all four monitors in the Beaumont region were well below a level of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire increased on Oct. 4 due to low-level increases in hourly concentrations. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were within the range of typical concentrations in this area and were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors in the Beaumont region remained low but were slightly higher than on Oct 4. These concentrations were typical for this area and time of year.

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Oct. 3, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors on Oct. 3. The monitor in Beaumont was down for maintenance for half of the day on Oct. 3. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Nederland monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont and Port Arthur areas decreased on Oct. 3 compared to Oct. 2. Hourly SO2 concentrations at the monitor in Orange were elevated from 9 AM to 4 PM, with concentrations ranging from 13.9 to 92.7 ppb. The agency is looking into these higher SO2 concentrations. The 1-hour concentration (92.7 ppb) measured at noon was over the level of the national ambient air quality standard (75 ppb). The EPA set the SO2 national ambient air quality standard below a concentration shown in the scientific literature to have a mild respiratory effect. Setting the standard below health effect levels ensures that the standard protects public health with an adequate margin of safety. Therefore, although this 1-hour measurement was above the level of the standard, the public is unlikely to have experienced health effects due to ambient exposure to any of the measured SO2 concentrations in these areas.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire decreased on Oct. 3. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were within the range of typical concentrations in this area and were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors in the Beaumont area were slightly higher than on Oct 2, but were typical for this area and this time of year.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 13 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 13 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 9 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 35 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: In general, hourly VOC concentrations were low and in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Oct. 3. Most peak hourly benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations were similar or slightly increased compared to Oct. 2. The Galena Park and Clinton Drive monitors measured elevated 1-hour benzene concentrations of 5 ppb at 11 am and 6.15 ppb at 9 PM, respectively. The Milby Park monitor measured an elevated 1,3-butadiene concentration of 8.13 ppb at 10 pm, and an elevated styrene level of 23 ppb at 3 PM. Although elevated, these peak concentrations were well below a level of potential health concern. All other hourly benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene concentrations were consistently low. Twelve-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations for all monitors for the previous 365-day period remained low and were generally consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at monitors in the greater Houston area were very low, except at the three monitors in Texas City, which measured concentrations slightly above normal (maximum 1 hour measurement was 4.2 ppb at Texas City Ball Park). All hourly SO2 concentrations were well below a level of health concern.

All 24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations measured at monitors in the greater Houston area decreased on Oct. 3 compared to Oct. 2. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were within the range of typical concentrations in this area and were below concentrations of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations were generally low and decreased at all monitoring locations in the greater Houston area on Oct. 3.

All refineries in the Houston area are now fully operational. The TCEQ will continue to evaluate available air quality data in this region, but will discontinue the daily evaluation of air quality on this Hurricane Harvey response page. Data will still be available on the TCEQ’s public page.

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Oct. 2, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 2 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors on Oct. 2. The monitor in Beaumont was down for maintenance for the majority of the day on Oct. 2. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Port Arthur and Nederland monitors. The 12-month average concentrations at the Nederland monitor were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont and Port Arthur areas decreased on Oct. 2. Hourly SO2 concentrations at the monitor in Orange were elevated from 8 to 11 pm, with concentrations ranging from 23.1 to 87.0 ppb. The 1-hour concentration (87 ppb) measured at 10 pm was over the level of the national ambient air quality standard (75 ppb). The EPA set the SO2 national ambient air quality standard below a concentration shown in the scientific literature to have a mild respiratory effect. Setting the standard below health effect levels ensures that the standard protects public health with an adequate margin of safety. Therefore, although this 1-hour measurement was just above the level of the standard, the public is unlikely to have experienced health effects due to ambient exposure to any of the measured SO2 concentrations in these areas.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire decreased on Oct. 2. The greatest 24-hour average decrease (5.9 µg/m3) was measured at the Hamshire monitor. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were within the range of typical concentrations in this area and below concentrations of health concern.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors decreased compared to concentrations on Oct. 1. Ozone concentrations were typical for this area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 13 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 13 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 7 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 33 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: In general, hourly VOC concentrations were low and in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Oct. 2. Most peak hourly benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations decreased or slightly increased compared to Oct. 1. The Galena Park monitor measured an elevated 1-hour benzene concentration of 6.3 ppb at 1 am and the Milby Park monitor measured an elevated 1,3-butadiene concentration of 9.15 ppb at 10 pm. Although elevated, these peak concentrations were well below a level of potential health concern. All other hourly benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations were consistently low. Twelve-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations for all monitors for the previous 365-day period remained low and were generally consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at all monitors in the greater Houston area decreased at all monitors except the Texas City Ball Park monitor, which had a small increase. All hourly SO2 concentrations were very low and well below a level of health concern.

There was a reduction of between 2.8 and 5.5 µg/m3 in the 24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations measured at monitors in the greater Houston area on Oct. 2 compared to Oct. 1. The largest decreases were measured at monitors in Aldine, Deer Park, and Seabrook. All measured concentrations were within ranges measured in September and remained below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations were generally low and decreased at all monitoring locations in the greater Houston area on Oct. 2.

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Sept. 29, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors from Sept. 29-Oct. 1. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Port Arthur and Nederland monitors. The 12-month average concentrations at the Nederland monitor were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange areas were increased, but remained low from Sept. 29-Oct 1. The highest 1-hour SO2 concentrations measured in the region occurred at the Orange monitor from approximately 9 am to 1 pm on Oct. 1, with concentrations ranging from 5.4 to 19.4 ppb. These concentrations, as well as all other measured SO2 concentrations in these areas were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire increased on Sept. 29, decreased on Sept. 30, then increased on Oct. 1. In general, the elevated 24-hour averages were due to low-level increases in hourly PM2.5 concentrations. The highest concentrations were noted on Sept. 29 from 5-6 pm in Mauriceville and on Oct. 1 at noon in Hamshire. Although elevated, all measured PM2.5 concentrations were within the range of typical concentrations in this area and below concentrations of health concern.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors were generally consistent with concentrations on Sept. 28. However, peak 8-hour average concentrations increased on Sept. 30 at the Port Arthur, Sabine Pass, and Hamshire monitors. Ozone concentrations were typical for this area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 13 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 13 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 6 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 32 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: In general, hourly VOC concentrations were low and in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area from Sept. 29-Oct 1. The Channelview monitor measured an elevated 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration of 12.25 ppb at 7 am on Sept. 30. In addition, low-level increases in peak 1-hour benzene concentrations were measured at the Galena Park monitor at 10 pm on Oct. 1 (5.7 ppb), at the Deer Park monitor at 8 pm on Sept. 30 (6.48 ppb) and 5 am on Oct. 1 (6.5 ppb), and at the Haden Road monitor at 9 pm on Oct. 1 (3.9 ppb). Although elevated, these peak concentrations were well below a level of potential health concern. All other hourly benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations were consistently low. Equipment issues led to decreased data return at the Channelview monitor on Oct. 1 and the Galena Park monitor on Sept. 30. Twelve-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations for all monitors for the previous 365-day period remained low and were generally consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at all monitors in the greater Houston area increased, but remained very low from Sept. 29-Oct. 1. The largest peak 1-hour concentration (10.7 ppb) was measured at the Park Place monitor in southeast Houston Oct. 1. All hourly SO2 concentrations were well below a level of health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations increased on Sept. 29, decreased on Sept. 30, then increased on Oct. 1. Due to equipment issues no data have been reported from the Galveston monitor since Sept. 28 and from the Conroe monitor since the early morning of Oct 1.The highest 24-hour averages were measured at the Park Place and Aldine monitors on Oct. 1. Although elevated, all measured concentrations were within ranges measured in September and remained below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations generally increased at all monitoring locations in the greater Houston area over the weekend. Peak 8-hour ozone concentrations were particularly elevated on Oct. 1 at the Houston East, Aldine, Tomball, Clinton, and Lang monitors, consistent with the ozone action alert sent by the TCEQ on Sept. 30. Although elevated, ozone concentrations were typical for the Houston area at this time of year.

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Sept. 28, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 2 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: In general, hourly VOC concentrations remained consistently low at the Port Arthur and Nederland monitors. The Beaumont monitor is currently down for maintenance. The monitor in Port Arthur did measure elevated hourly benzene concentrations from midnight to 3 am, with a peak 1-hour concentration of 8.24 ppb. Although elevated, this peak concentration is still over 21 times lower than a level of potential health concern. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period remained very low for the Port Arthur and Nederland monitors. The 12-month average concentrations at the Nederland monitor were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations were consistently low in the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange areas on Sept. 28. All measured SO2 concentrations in these areas were far below concentrations of health concern.

Compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 27, 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations increased at the monitors in Port Arthur and Mauriceville due to low-level hourly increases throughout the day. The Hamshire monitor experienced ongoing equipment issues and a 24-hour average PM2.5 concentration could not be calculated. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were within the range of typical concentrations in this area and below concentrations of health concern.

Peak 8-hour average ozone concentrations decreased at all monitors in Beaumont, Hamshire, Orange, Port Arthur, and Nederland. There was a low-level increase in peak 8-hour average concentrations at the monitor in Sabine Pass. Overall, ozone concentrations remained low and typical for this area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 13 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 13 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 36 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: In general, hourly VOC concentrations continued to be low and in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 28. Peak 1-hour benzene concentrations had minor fluctuations at most monitors, with the exception of Galena Park and Deer Park. There was a 1-hour peak concentration of 7.33 ppb benzene at the Galena Park monitor at 7 pm on Sept. 28. In addition, there was an elevated 1-hour benzene concentration of 4.21 ppb at the Deer Park monitor at 7 am. Hourly concentrations before and after these hours were very low at both monitors. Although elevated, these concentrations are still 24-42 times below a level of health concern. Twelve-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations for all monitors for the previous 365-day period remained low and were generally consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at all monitors in the greater Houston area remained very low on Sept. 28 and were generally consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 27. All SO2 concentrations remained well below concentrations of health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations at all PM2.5 monitors in the greater Houston area increased compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 27 due to low-level increases in hourly PM2.5 concentrations. 24-hour average concentrations were highest in Conroe and Aldine, on the north side of Houston. Although increased, all measured concentrations were within ranges measured in September and remained below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations at monitoring locations in the greater Houston area either slightly increased or decreased from concentrations measured on Sept. 27. Concentrations were consistent with the low concentrations measured in late September.

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Sept. 27, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period also remained very low for all three monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations were consistently low in the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange areas on Sept. 27. All measured SO2 concentrations in these areas were far below concentrations of health concern.

Compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 26, 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations slightly increased at the monitors in Port Arthur and stayed the same at the monitor in Mauriceville. A 24-hour average PM2.5 concentration could not be calculated for the Hamshire monitor due to equipment issues. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were within the range of typical concentrations in this area and below concentrations of health concern.

Low-level increases in 8-hour average ozone concentrations were measured at the monitors in Beaumont, Hamshire, Port Arthur, and Nederland. Peak 8-hour average concentrations decreased at monitors in Orange and Sabine Pass. Ozone concentrations were consistently low and typical for this area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 13 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 12 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 32 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: In general, hourly VOC concentrations continued to be low and in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 27. Peak 1-hour benzene concentrations were slightly increased or consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 26, with the exception of Galena Park and Channelview where peak benzene concentrations decreased. Twelve-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations for all monitors for the previous 365-day period remained low and were generally consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at all monitors in the greater Houston area remained very low on Sept. 27. All SO2 concentrations remained well below concentrations of health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations at most PM2.5 monitors in the greater Houston area were similar to concentrations measured on Sept. 26. 24-hour average concentrations increased at the Deer Park, Aldine, and Conroe monitors, with the largest increase measured at the Conroe monitor. Although increased, all measured concentrations were within ranges measured in September and remained below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations at monitoring locations in the greater Houston area either slightly increased or were consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 26. Concentrations were consistent with the low concentrations measured in late September.

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Sept. 26, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 6 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: In general, hourly VOC concentrations remained consistently low at all three monitors. Peak hourly benzene concentrations decreased at the Beaumont and Port Arthur monitors and there was a low-level increase in peak 1-hour benzene concentration at the Nederland monitor. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period also remained very low for all three monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Low-level increases in peak hourly SO2 concentrations were measured in the Beaumont and Port Arthur areas on Sept. 26. Hourly concentrations from approximately noon to 1 pm were increased at the monitor in Orange. Although increased, these concentrations, as well as all other measured SO2 concentrations in these areas were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur and Hamshire decreased compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 25. The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentration at the monitor in Mauriceville slightly increased from Sept. 25 due to low-level hourly increases in the late afternoon. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were within the range of typical concentrations in this area and below concentrations of health concern.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors slightly increased from concentrations measured on Sept. 25, but were within the low range of concentrations measured since Sept. 14. Ozone concentrations were typical for this area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 13 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 12 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 35 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: In general, hourly VOC concentrations were low and in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 26. Most monitors in the greater Houston area measured only slight increases in peak 1-hour benzene concentrations compared to Sept. 25. A 1-hour benzene concentration (8.57 ppb) at the Galena Park monitor was elevated at 1 am, but decreased for the rest of the day. Although elevated, this benzene concentration is still 21 times lower than a level of potential health concern. Twelve-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations for all monitors for the previous 365-day period remained low and were generally consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at all monitors in the greater Houston area were very low on Sept. 26 and generally similar to concentrations measured on Sept. 25. The one exception was at the Houston North Wayside monitor that had a low-level increase in hourly SO2 concentrations in the mid-morning compared to the previous day. All SO2 concentrations remained well below concentrations of health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations at all PM2.5 monitors in the greater Houston area were similar to concentrations measured on Sept. 25. All measured concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations at all monitoring locations in the greater Houston area on Sept. 26 were low and either slightly increased or were consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 25.

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Sept. 25, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: In general, hourly VOC concentrations remained consistently low at all three monitors. There was an elevated 1-hour benzene concentration (23.5 ppb) at the monitor in Port Arthur at 3 am, which corresponded with a low-level increase in 1,3-butadiene (5.44 ppb) also at 3 am. In addition, hourly 1,3-butadiene concentrations at the Nederland monitor increased over a 2-hour period from 2-3 am, with a peak 1-hour concentration of 3.41 ppb. Although elevated the peak benzene concentration is still over 7 times lower than a level of short-term health concern and the peak 1,3-butadiene concentrations are over 300 times lower than a level of short-term health concern. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations from the previous 365-day period also remained very low for all three monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont and Port Arthur areas were lower than or consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 24. Hourly concentrations from approximately 9 am to 3 pm were increased, with the peak 1-hour concentration occurring at 11 am. Although increased, these concentrations, as well as all other measured SO2 concentrations in these areas were far below concentrations of health concern

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire decreased compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 24. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were within the range of typical concentrations in this area and below concentrations of health concern.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors on Sept. 25 slightly increased from concentrations measured on Sept. 24, but were within the low range of concentrations measured since Sept. 16. Ozone concentrations were typical for this area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 13 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 13 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 30 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: In general, hourly VOC concentrations were low and in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 25. Hourly benzene concentrations at the Galena Park monitor increased over a 2-hour period from 2-3 am and a lower level increase was measured at 10 pm, with a peak 1-hour concentration of 7.36 ppb. Two hourly benzene concentrations were also increased at the Channelview monitor from 11 pm to midnight, with a peak concentration of 3.12 ppb. Although elevated, the benzene concentrations are still 24-57 times lower than a level of potential health concern. An elevated 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration was also measured at the Milby Park monitor at 7 pm, though this concentration was over 270 times lower than a level of potential health concern. Hourly benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations at all other monitors decreased or were consistent with hourly concentrations measured over the weekend. Twelve-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations for all monitors for the previous 365-day period remained low and were generally consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

 

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at all monitors in the greater Houston area were very low and decreased on Sept. 25 compared to Sept. 24 at all but one monitor. All SO2 concentrations remained well below concentrations of health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations at all PM2.5 monitors in the greater Houston area decreased on Sept. 25 compared to Sept. 24. All measured concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations at all monitoring locations in the greater Houston area on Sept. 25 were low and consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 24.

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Sept. 22-24, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: ourly VOC concentrations, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors from Sept. 22-24. One hourly benzene concentration at the Port Arthur Memorial School site was elevated on Sept. 24, but concentrations were still over 24 times lower than a level of potential health concern and hourly concentrations before and after this hour remained consistently low. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations the previous 365-day period also remained very low for all three monitors. These 12-month average concentrations at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average for the Port Arthur monitor for comparison to current values. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont and Port Arthur areas were consistently very low from Sept. 22-24. Two hourly concentrations, one at 10 am on Sept. 22 and one at 10 am on Sept. 24, were elevated above concentrations measured since Sept. 17. Although increased, these concentrations, as well as all other measured SO2 concentrations in these areas were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire increased on Sept. 23 compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 22 and 24, due to low-level increases in hourly concentrations. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were within the range of typical concentrations in this area and below concentrations of health concern.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors slightly increased on Sept. 22, but decreased on Sept. 23 and 24. Ozone concentrations were typical for this area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 13 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 12 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 7 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 35 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: In general, hourly VOC concentrations were low and in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area from Sept. 22-24. Hourly benzene concentrations at the Galena Park monitor increased from 11 pm on Sept. 23 to 5 am on Sept. 24, with concentrations ranging from 10.93 to 16.58 ppb. Although elevated, the peak benzene concentration was still over 10 times lower than a level of potential health concern. Twelve-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations for all monitors for the previous 365-day period remained low and were generally consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

 

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at all monitors in the greater Houston area remained very low from Sept. 22-24. The peak 1-hour concentration measured at the Houston North Wayside monitor in northeast Houston increased on Sept. 22, but decreased on Sept. 23 and 24. All hourly SO2 concentrations were well below a level of health concern.

Most monitors in the greater Houston area had low-level increases in 1-hour and 24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations from the night of Sept. 22 to the morning of Sept. 24. The monitor in the Deer Park area was down for several hours on Sept. 23 and 24, so a 24-hour average could not be calculated. Hourly concentrations at this monitor were lower than concentrations measured on Sept. 20. All measured concentrations were within ranges measured in September and remained below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations at all monitoring locations in the greater Houston area increased from Sept. 22-24 compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 21. However, concentrations still remained low and were typical for the Houston area.

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Sept. 21, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations the previous 365-day period also remained very low and, with the exception of benzene at the Port Arthur site, were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough benzene data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange area were lower than or consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 20. All measured concentrations of SO2 were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire increased compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 20, due to low-level increases in hourly concentrations. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were within the range of typical concentrations in this area and below concentrations of health concern.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors on Sept. 21 slightly increased from concentrations measured on Sept. 20, but were within the range of concentrations measured since Sept. 16. Ozone concentrations were typical for this area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 13 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 12 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 7 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 31 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: In general, hourly VOC concentrations were low and in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 21. Hourly benzene concentrations at the Galena Park monitor increased over a 3-hour period from 10 pm on Sept. 21 to midnight on Sept. 22, with concentrations ranging from 11.48 to 14.26 ppb. Hourly 1,3-butadiene concentrations were also somewhat elevated during this same time period. Although elevated, the benzene concentrations are still 12-15 times lower than a level of potential health concern and the 1,3-butadiene concentrations are over 470 times lower than a level of potential health concern. An elevated 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration was also measured at the Milby Park monitor at 10 pm, though this concentration was over 390 times lower than a level of potential health concern. Hourly benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations at all other monitors decreased or were slightly higher than hourly concentrations measured on Sept. 20. Twelve-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations for all monitors for the previous 365-day period remained low and were generally consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at all monitors in the greater Houston area were very low. The peak 1-hour concentration measured at the Houston North Wayside monitor in northeast Houston increased from Sept. 20, but was well below a level of health concern. All other peak hourly SO2 concentrations decreased or were consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 20 and were well below concentrations of health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations at all PM2.5 monitors in the greater Houston area decreased on Sept. 21 compared to Sept. 20. The monitor in the Seabrook area was down for several hours for maintenance, so a 24-hour average could not be calculated. Hourly concentrations at this monitor were lower than concentrations measured on Sept. 20. All measured concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations at all monitoring locations in the greater Houston area on Sept. 21 were low and either decreased or were consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 20.

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Sept. 20, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations the previous 365-day period also remained very low and, with the exception of benzene at the Port Arthur site, were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough benzene data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at the Port Arthur 7th St monitor (located in South Port Arthur) and Port Arthur West (located in West Port Arthur) on Sept. 20 increased above the peak concentration from Sept. 19, but were still very low. Hourly SO2 concentrations measured at the other monitors in the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange area were lower than or consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 19. All measured concentrations of SO2 were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire decreased compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 19. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors on Sept. 20 were generally consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 19. Ozone concentrations were typical for this area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 12 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 12 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 7 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 31 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations were low and in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 20. In general, hourly benzene concentrations at all monitors decreased or were similar to hourly concentrations measured on Sept. 19. Hourly 1,3-butadiene concentrations slightly increased or were consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 19. The highest 1-hour benzene concentration, which was measured at the Channelview monitor, was still 28 times lower than a level of short-term health concern. Twelve-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations for all monitors for the previous 365-day period remained low and were generally consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at all monitors in the greater Houston area were very low and consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 19. All measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations at all PM2.5 monitors in the greater Houston area were increased on Sept. 20 compared to Sept. 19, due to low-level hourly increases. The monitor in the Seabrook area was down for several hours for maintenance, so a 24-hour average could not be calculated. Hourly concentrations at this monitor were consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 19. Measured 24-hour and hourly PM2.5 concentrations at all monitors in the greater Houston area were typical for this area. All measured concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations at all monitoring locations in the greater Houston area on Sept. 20 were low and either decreased or were consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 19.

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Sept. 19, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors. The 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations the previous 365-day period also remained very low and, with the exception of benzene at the Port Arthur site, were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough benzene data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at the Port Arthur 7th St monitor on Sept. 19 increased above the peak concentration from Sept. 18, but was still very low. Hourly SO2 concentrations measured at the other monitors in the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange area were lower than or consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 18. All measured concentrations of SO2 were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire increased compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 18, but were typical for this area. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors on Sept. 19 were slightly increased or consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 18. Ozone concentrations were typical for this area.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 1 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 5 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: All refineries in the Corpus Christi area are now fully operational. Hourly VOC and SO2 concentrations, 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations, and 8-hour maximum ozone concentrations measured on Sept. 19 continued to be low and consistent with concentrations measured this month. Since ambient air quality monitors have resumed operation in late August and early September, daily air quality reviews and evaluations of long-term trends indicate that air pollutant concentrations at regional ambient air monitors have remained low and consistent with typical concentrations at these sites. The TCEQ will continue to evaluate all available air quality data in this region, but will discontinue the daily evaluation of air quality on this Hurricane Harvey response page. Data will still be available on the TCEQ’s public webpage.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 10 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 12 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 30 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations were low and in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 19. Hourly benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations decreased or were consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 18. The highest 1-hour benzene concentration, which was measured at the Haden Road monitor, was still 57 times lower than a level of short-term health concern. Twelve-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations for all monitors for the previous 365-day period remained low and were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at all monitors in the greater Houston area were very low and consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 18. All measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations at all PM2.5 monitors in the greater Houston area were increased on Sept. 19 compared to Sept. 18, but were within ranges measured in Sept. 2017. Most monitors saw low level hourly PM2.5 increases beginning in the afternoon and evening of Sept. 19. All measured concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations on Sept. 19 slightly increased at all monitoring locations in the greater Houston area compared to Sept. 18, but were still low compared to peak concentrations earlier this month. Several ozone monitors were not operational for at least 75% of the day on Sept. 19 and are not included in this analysis.

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Sept. 18, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 5 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations, including benzene and 1,3-butadiene, remained consistently low at all three monitors. In addition, 12-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations were calculated for all three monitors for the Sept. 2016-Sept. 2017 period. These averages were very low and, with the exception of benzene at the Port Arthur site, were consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. There was not enough benzene data available in the 2015-2016 period to calculate a representative 12-month average. These averages indicate that any peak hourly concentrations measured since the monitors resumed operation in late August and early September have not impacted long-term average concentrations or risk of long-term health effects. Therefore, all measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at the monitors in the Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange were lower than concentrations measured on Sept. 17. All measured concentrations of SO2 were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire were similar to concentrations measured on Sept. 18. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors on Sept. 18 were consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 17. Ozone concentrations were typical for this area.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 3 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Maximum 1-hour benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene concentrations at this monitor all decreased from Sept. 17 levels. In addition, the 12-month average concentration from Sept. 2016-Sept. 2017 has remained low and consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. These averages indicate that any peak hourly concentrations measured since the monitors resumed operation in late August and early September have not impacted long-term average concentrations. All measured VOC concentrations have remained far below levels of short- and long-term health concern.

Hourly maximum SO2 concentrations measured on Sept. 18 were similar to or lower than concentrations measured on Sept. 17 and remained far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations measured at the two monitors in the Corpus Christi area increased compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 17 due to lower level hourly increases in PM2.5 in the morning (North Padre Island) and evening (Dona Park). All PM2.5 concentrations were still below levels of health concern and within typical ranges.

Measured 8-hour average ozone concentrations on Sept. 18 decreased compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 17 for the three monitors operating in the Corpus Christi area. The ozone monitors at Corpus Christi West (near Del Mar College) and Tuloso (near West Guth Park in northwest Corpus Christi) were not operational for more than half of the day on Sept. 18. The hourly ozone concentrations collected were low or consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 17.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 12 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 12 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 32 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly VOC concentrations were low and in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 18. All monitored VOC concentrations were far below levels of health concern. Twelve-month average benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations were calculated for all monitors from Sept. 2016-Sept. 2017. These averages indicate that long-term concentrations are low, well below long-term air monitoring comparison values, and consistent with the same period from 2015-2016. Any peak hourly concentrations measured since the monitors resumed operation in late August and early September have not impacted long-term average concentrations or risk of long-term health effects.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at all monitors in the greater Houston area except the Wayside monitor decreased on Sept. 18 and remained consistently low across the area. The peak 1-hour SO2 concentration at the Wayside monitor slightly increased from Sept. 17, but was still very low. All measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations on Sept. 18 at Clinton Drive and three coastal monitors located in Galveston 99th Street, Baytown, and Seabrook slightly increased compared to concentrations on Sept. 17. 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at all other locations in the greater Houston area decreased compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 17. All measured concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations on Sept. 18 decreased at all monitoring locations in the greater Houston area compared to Sept. 17. Ozone monitors in Galveston, Sugarland, Clear Brook, Sheldon, and Channelview were not operational for at least 75% of the day on Sept. 18 and are not included in this analysis. Hourly ozone concentrations at the monitors in Sugarland, Sheldon, and Channelview were decreased or consistent with hourly concentrations on Sept. 17.

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Sept. 15-17, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 4 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: VOC monitors provided real-time data for a residential area in southern downtown Beaumont, at a school in Nederland that is southeast of Beaumont, and at a school in north Port Arthur. Maximum 1-hour benzene concentrations at all three monitors slightly increased on Sept. 17 and maximum 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration slightly increased on Sept. 15 at the Nederland monitor, but hourly concentrations remained uniformly low throughout the Sept. 15-17 period.  A peak 1-hour All measured hourly VOC concentrations were generally very low and remained far below levels of health concern.

Except for a 1-hour peak concentration at 4 pm on Sept. 17, peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at Beaumont and Port Arthur monitors were consistently low from Sept. 15-17. The 1-hour peak measured at the Port Arthur West monitor was higher than concentrations measured recently, but still well below levels of health concern. Peak 1-hour SO2 concentrations on Sept. 15 and 17 at the monitor in Orange were higher than concentrations typically measured, though hourly concentrations before and after these peak values were uniformly low. All measured concentrations of SO2 were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire continued to decrease since Sept. 13. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were below concentrations of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors steadily decreased from Sept. 14-17. Ozone concentrations were typical for this area. 

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 5 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Hourly benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene concentrations at this monitor were consistently low from Sept. 15-17. Concentrations of all measured VOCs have remained far below levels of health concern.

Hourly maximum SO2 concentrations measured from Sept. 15-17 were similar to concentrations measured since Sept. 13 and were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations measured at the monitors on North Padre Island and in the Dona Park community decreased from Sept. 14-17. All PM2.5 concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentrations at all monitors steadily decreased from Sept. 14-17 for all monitors in the Corpus Christi area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 12 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 12 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 34 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area from Sept. 15-17 and all monitored VOC concentrations were far below levels of health concern. The peak 1-hour benzene concentrations measured during this period were 4.55 ppb at the Galena Park monitor on Sept. 16 and 4.1 ppb at the Deer Park monitor on Sept. 17. Hourly concentrations before and after these peaks were uniformly low. These peak concentrations are still within the range of maximum concentrations measured at these monitors and are over 39 times lower than a level of potential health concern. The peak 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration measured during this period was 4.3 ppb at the Haden Road monitor on Sept. 15. This peak concentration is approximately 395 times lower than a level of potential health concern.

In general, hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the greater Houston area from Sept. 15-17 remained consistently low at most Houston area monitors. One peak 1-hour concentration at the Park Place monitor was elevated above concentrations measured since Sept. 13 at that monitor, but levels quickly reduced to typically very low concentrations. Elevated 1-hour concentrations were measured at the Texas City 31st Street and Logan Street monitors on the afternoon of Sept. 17, consistent with an emission event reported by Blanchard Refinery. The 1-hour peak concentration measured at the 31st Street monitor was elevated above the 1-hour national ambient air quality standard. The TCEQ is following up on this event. All other hourly concentrations measured at these monitors are well below a level of potential health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations at Clinton, Deer Park, and Seabrook increased on Sept. 16 due to a 1-hour peak PM2.5 concentration at 7 am. Hourly concentrations quickly decreased for the rest of the day and 24-hour concentrations decreased on Sept. 17. 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the Houston Aldine and Conroe monitors increased on Sept. 16 compared to Sept. 15 due to increased low level hourly PM2.5 concentrations. The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentration at Houston Aldine decreased on Sept. 17, but was consistent with Sept. 16 levels at Conroe. 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations decreased throughout the weekend at the monitors in Galveston and Baytown. All PM2.5 concentrations were below concentrations of health concern.

Ozone concentrations at all greater Houston area monitors decreased on Sept. 15 compared to Sept. 14. The daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentration increased on Sept. 16 for most monitors in the greater Houston area, but concentrations were still at levels typical for Houston at this time of year. Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations at all monitors decreased or stayed the same on Sept. 17. 

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Sept. 14, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 4 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: VOC monitors provided real-time data for a residential area in southern downtown Beaumont, at a school in Nederland that is southeast of Beaumont, and at a school in north Port Arthur. Benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations slightly increased at all three monitors compared to Sept. 13, but measured concentrations were generally very low. All measured VOC concentrations remained far below levels of health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured at the Beaumont and Port Arthur monitors were lower than concentrations measured on Sept. 13. The peak 1-hour SO2 concentration at the monitor in Orange increased above concentrations measured on Sept. 12, though hourly concentrations before and after this value were uniformly low. All measured concentrations of SO2 were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire decreased compared to Sept. 10-13. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were below concentrations of health concern

Measured ozone concentrations at all monitors decreased on Sept. 14 compared to those measured on Sept. 13. Ozone concentrations were typical for this area.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 3 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 5 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Maximum 1-hour benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene concentrations at this monitor all decreased from Sept. 12 levels. Concentrations of all measured VOCs have remained far below levels of health concern.

Hourly maximum SO2 concentrations measured on Sept. 14 were similar to concentrations measured on Sept. 13 and remained far below concentrations of health concern.

The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentration measured at the monitor on North Padre Island decreased compared to levels measured from Sept. 6-13. The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentration measured at the monitor in the Dona Park community was consistent with the 24-hour average from Sept. 11 and typical for this area. Hourly concentrations at both monitors were higher in the early morning and diminished throughout the day. All PM2.5 concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations on Sept. 14 decreased compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 13 for all monitors in the Corpus Christi area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 11 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 11 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 27 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 13 and all monitored VOC concentrations were far below levels of health concern. The largest 1-hour increases were measured at the Galena Park monitor, which had a peak 1-hour benzene concentration of 4.9 ppb, and Milby Park monitor, which had a peak 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration of 4.3 ppb. Low-level increases in maximum 1-hour benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations were noted at other monitoring sites in Houston and Texas City. The highest measured 1-hour benzene concentration was still 36 times lower than concentrations of potential health concern and the highest measured 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration was over 395 times lower than a level of potential health concern. Decreases in maximum 1-hour benzene concentration were measured at the Haden Road and Channelview monitors and decreases in maximum 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentrations were measured at the Texas City 34th St and Haden Road monitors.

Hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Houston area on Sept. 14 decreased at most Houston area monitors and remained consistently low across the area. All measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations measured at all locations in the greater Houston area on Sept. 14 decreased compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 13. In general, hourly PM2.5 concentrations were elevated in the early morning and decreased throughout the rest of the day. All measured concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations remained elevated at the Atascocita, Conroe, and Aldine monitors located north and northeast of Houston. In general, ozone concentrations remained at levels that are typical for Houston at this time of year.

NOTE: The next air quality report will be posted on Monday, September 18.

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Sept. 13, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 4 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 3 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: VOC monitors provided real-time data for a residential area in southern downtown Beaumont, at a school in Nederland that is southeast of Beaumont, and at a school in north Port Arthur. The measured VOC concentrations were generally very low. Benzene concentrations decreased at the Beaumont and Nederland monitors and slightly increased at the Port Arthur monitor. All measured VOC concentrations were far below levels of health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont-Port Arthur-Orange area slightly increased above concentrations measured on Sept. 12. However, all measured concentrations of SO2 were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Port Arthur, Mauriceville, and Hamshire increased compared to Sept. 12 and were above average compared to 2016. However, all measured PM2.5 concentrations were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations at all but the ozone monitor at Jefferson County Airport increased on Sept. 13 compared to those measured on Sept. 12. The increased ozone concentrations were dominated by high incoming background ozone from Sept. 12.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 3 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 5 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range at the monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area. Benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene concentrations at this monitor all decreased from Sept. 12 levels and concentrations of all measured VOCs have remained far below levels of health concern.

Hourly maximum SO2 concentrations measured on Sept. 13 decreased from concentrations measured on Sept. 12 and remained far below concentrations of health concern.

The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentration measured at the monitor on North Padre Island was consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 12. Concentrations were higher in the morning and diminished throughout the day. The PM2.5 monitor in the Dona Park community in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area only captured 12 hours of data on Sept. 13, so a 24-hour average could not be calculated. However, 1-hour concentrations were lower than concentrations measured the last several days. All PM2.5 concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations on Sept. 13 decreased compared to concentrations measured on Sept. 12 for all monitors in the Corpus Christi area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 11 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 11 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 30 for ozone

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 13 and all monitored concentrations were far below levels of health concern. There was a 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration at the Texas City 34th Street monitor that was elevated above concentrations measured on Sept. 12; however hourly concentrations were uniformly low before and after this hour. Maximum 1-hour concentrations of benzene decreased at all Texas City and all but one Houston area monitors. A single 1-hour benzene concentration at the Haden Road monitoring site was elevated above concentrations measured on Sept. 12, but concentrations were uniformly low before and after this hour. There were similar low-level increases in maximum 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentrations at the Galena Park, Wallisville, and Clinton Drive monitoring sites in Houston. Daily maximum hourly concentrations for benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene on Sept. 13 were higher than typical concentrations in 2016; however the highest measured 1-hour benzene concentration was still 79 times lower than concentrations of potential health concern and the highest measured 1-hour 1,3-butadiene concentration was over 900 times lower than a level of potential health concern.

Hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Houston area on Sept. 13 remained consistently low. Houston Deer Park and Houston Monroe measured the highest 1-hour SO2 concentrations (10 ppb), but these peak concentrations and all measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

Most 24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations measured in the greater Houston area on Sept. 13 were decreased or similar to concentrations measured on Sept. 12. The 24-hr average PM2.5 concentration at the Conroe monitor north of Houston increased due to elevated PM2.5 concentrations in the early morning and late evening. Although 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations at all Houston area monitors were above average compared to 2016, all measured concentrations were below levels of health concern.

All but seven ozone monitors in the greater Houston area measured decreases in 8-hour maximum ozone concentrations on Sept. 13. Higher 8-hour ozone concentrations were measured at the Atascocita, Crosby, and Baytown Garth monitors northeast of Houston. An ozone action alert was issued for the Houston area for Sept. 13 on Sept. 12.

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Sept. 12, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 4 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: VOC monitors provided real-time data for a residential area in southern downtown Beaumont, at a school in Nederland that is southeast of Beaumont, and at a school in north Port Arthur. The measured VOC concentrations were generally very low. All measured VOC concentrations were far below levels of health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont-Port Arthur-Orange area were somewhat higher than those typically measured at these monitors, though 1 hour maximum concentrations were lower or consistent with concentrations measured on Sept. 11. All measured concentrations of SO2 were far below concentrations of health concern.

At the time of this report, no data were available for the monitor in Port Arthur due to technical difficulties. 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Mauriceville was somewhat higher than average, but decreased from Sept. 11. 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the Hamshire monitor were above average and were increased from Sept. 11. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations on Sept. 12 slightly increased compared to those measured on Sept. 11, and were typical for the Beaumont area at this time of year.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 5 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range at the monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area. There was a brief increase in benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene concentrations at this monitor, but this and other measured VOC concentrations were still far below concentrations of health concern.

Hourly maximum SO2 concentrations measured on Sept. 12 were higher than concentrations measured on Sept. 10 at two monitors in the Corpus Christi area, but were far below concentrations of health concern.

The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations measured at the monitors on North Padre Island and the Dona Park community in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area, were somewhat higher than average and higher than those measured on Sept 11. However, all concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations on Sept. 12 increased above concentrations measured on Sept. 11 for all monitors in the Corpus Christi area, but were typical for this time of year.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 10 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 11 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 29 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 12 and all monitored concentrations were far below levels of health concern. At the 3 monitors operating in the Texas City area, benzene concentrations were somewhat higher than 2016 average concentrations for the area, but were far below concentrations of health concern. The 7 operating VOC monitors in Houston are primarily located in the industrial areas on the east side of the city, with several in the ship channel area. The maximum hourly concentrations for benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene on Sept. 12 were higher than is typical at most of the monitoring sites in Houston, although the highest measured 1-hr benzene concentration was still 50-times lower than concentrations of possible health concern.

Most hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Houston area on Sept. 12 were very low. Although most monitors had a slight to moderate increase in maximum 1 hour SO2 concentration compared to Sept. 11, all measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations measured on Sept. 12 were increased compared to Sept. 11, and were higher than average at all of the monitors in Houston and Galveston. The 24-hr average PM2.5 concentration at the Conroe monitor north of Houston saw the biggest increase in the area. The peak concentration at several monitors occurred in the early morning hours. All measured concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Increases in 8-hour maximum ozone concentrations were measured at most monitoring locations in the greater Houston area on Sept. 12, consistent with the high forecasted ozone alert the TCEQ sent out on Sept. 11. The highest concentrations were measured at Seabrook Friendship Park and Texas City 34th Street.

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Sept. 11, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 4 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 6 for ozone

Air Quality Summary: VOC monitors provided real-time data for a residential area in southern downtown Beaumont, at a school in Nederland that is southeast of Beaumont, and at a school in north Port Arthur. The measured VOC concentrations were generally very low, with the exception of a higher 1 hr maximum concentration of 1,3-butadiene at the Port Arthur Memorial School monitor. This and all other measured VOC concentrations were far below levels of health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont-Port Arthur-Orange area were somewhat higher than those typically measured at these monitors. On Sept. 11, 1 hour maximum SO2 concentrations had increased slightly at the Port Arthur 7th street and Orange 1st street monitors, but had decreased at the Beaumont downtown and Port Arthur West monitors, compared to Sept. 10. All measured concentrations of SO2 were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Beaumont and Mauriceville were somewhat higher than average, and had increased from Sept. 10. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations on Sept. 11 were similar to those measured on Sept. 10, and were typical for the Beaumont area at this time of year.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 4 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range at the monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area. There was a brief increase in benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene concentrations at this monitor, but this and other measured VOC concentrations were still far below concentrations of health concern.

Hourly maximum SO2 concentrations measured on Sept. 11 were higher than concentrations measured on Sept. 10 at two monitors in the Corpus Christi area, but were far below concentrations of health concern.

The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations measured on North Padre Island, but not at the Dona Park monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area, were somewhat higher than average, with concentrations similar to or lower than those measured on Sept 10. All concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations on Sept. 11 in the Corpus Christi area were typical for this time of year, and were similar to those measured on Sept. 10.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 11 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 11 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 29 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 11 and all monitored concentrations were far below levels of health concern. At the 3 monitors operating in the Texas City area, benzene concentrations were consistent with 2016 average concentrations for the area and were far below concentrations of health concern. The 8 operating VOC monitors in Houston are primarily located in the industrial areas on the east side of the city, with several in the ship channel area. The maximum hourly concentrations for benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene on Sept. 11 were higher than is typical at most of the monitoring sites in Houston, and concentrations had generally increased somewhat from Sept. 10, although the highest measured 1-hr benzene concentration was still 75-times lower than concentrations of possible health concern. There was an increase in the 1 hour maximum concentration of 1,3-butadiene at the Channelview monitor on the east side of Houston, north of I-10, but this concentration was still 100-times lower than concentrations of potential health concern.

Most hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Houston area on Sept. 11 were very low. The monitor at Park Place (a neighborhood in southeast Houston) showed a somewhat higher 1-hour peak, but these and all other measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

24-hr average PM2.5 concentrations measured on Sept. 11 were increased compared to Sept. 10, and were higher than average at all of the monitors in Houston and Galveston, except at the Conroe monitor north of Houston. The monitors in Houston all showed somewhat higher concentrations of PM2.5 in the last few hours of the day (after 9 PM), which may be weather related. All measured concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Measured 8-hour maximum concentrations of ozone in Houston on Sept. 11 were similar to those measured on Sept. 10, and were typical for this time of year.

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Sept. 10, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 3 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 4 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: VOC monitors provided real-time data for a residential area in southern downtown Beaumont, at a school in Nederland that is southeast of Beaumont, and at a school in north Port Arthur. The measured VOC concentrations were generally very low, with the exception of a higher 1 hr maximum concentration of 1,3-butadiene at the Port Arthur Memorial School monitor. This and all other measured VOC concentrations were far below levels of health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont-Port Arthur-Orange area were somewhat higher than those typically measured at these monitors. Concentrations were higher at the downtown Beaumont monitor on Sept. 10 compared to Sept 9, but SO2 concentrations in Port Arthur and Orange had decreased. All measured concentrations of SO2 were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Beaumont and Mauriceville were somewhat higher than average, and had decreased compared to Sept. 9. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations on Sept. 10 were similar to those measured on Sept. 9, and were typical for the Beaumont area at this time of year.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 4 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range at the monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area. There was a brief, small increase in benzene concentrations at this monitor, but this and other measured VOC concentrations were still far below concentrations of health concern.

Hourly maximum SO2 concentrations on Sept. 10 were similar to concentrations measured on Sept. 9 at two monitors in the Corpus Christi area, and all measured levels were far below concentrations of health concern.

The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations measured on North Padre Island and at Dona Park monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area were somewhat higher than average, with concentrations similar to those measured on Sept 9. All concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations in the Corpus Christi area were typical for this time of year, and were slightly lower on Sept. 10 compared to Sept. 9.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 10 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 11 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 35 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 10 and all monitored concentrations were far below levels of health concern. At the 3 monitors operating in the Texas City area, benzene concentrations were consistent with 2016 average concentrations for the area and were far below concentrations of health concern. The 7 operating VOC monitors in Houston are primarily located in the industrial areas on the east side of the city, with several in the ship channel area. The maximum hourly concentrations for benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene on Sept. 10 were higher than is typical at most of the monitoring sites in Houston, but the highest measured benzene concentration was still 80-times lower than concentrations of possible health concern. Concentrations of benzene and 1,3-butadiene at the Milby Park monitor south of Manchester were slightly higher than average, but were still very low (maximum hourly benzene concentration of 0.43 ppb) and far below concentrations of health concern. Most VOC concentrations in the Houston area decreased from Sept. 9 to Sept. 10.

Most hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Houston area on Sept. 10 were very low. The monitor at Park Place (a neighborhood in southeast Houston) showed a somewhat higher 1-hour peak, but these and all other measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

Most 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations measured on Sept. 10 were in the typical range. PM2.5 concentrations near the Galveston airport, at the Aldine monitor in north central Houston, at the Park Place monitor, and at the Baytown monitor were higher than average, but still below concentrations of health concern. There was a short spike in hourly PM2.5 concentrations at 3-4 PM at the Aldine, Park Place, and Clinton monitors (near the ship channel), possibly generated by a source from the north northeast, but the concentrations were still below levels of health concern, and had decreased to normal levels by 5 PM.

Measured 8-hour maximum concentrations of ozone in Houston on Sept. 10 increased somewhat compared to Sept. 9, but were typical for this time of year.

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Sept. 9, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 2 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 4 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 7 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: VOC monitors provided real-time data for a residential area in southern downtown Beaumont and at a school in Nederland, southeast of Beaumont. The measured VOC concentrations were very low and were far below concentrations of health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont-Port Arthur-Orange area were somewhat higher than those typically measured at these monitors. Concentrations were slightly higher at the monitor northeast of Orange on Sept. 9 compared to Sept 8, but SO2 concentrations in Port Arthur had decreased. All measured concentrations of SO2 were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Beaumont and Mauriceville were somewhat higher than average, but had decreased compared to Sept. 8. All measured PM2.5 concentrations were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations on Sept. 9 were slightly lower than those measured on Sept. 8, and were typical for the Beaumont area at this time of year.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 4 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range at the monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area. The measured VOC concentrations were very low and were far below concentrations of health concern.

Hourly maximum SO2 concentrations on Sept. 9 increased slightly at two monitors in the Corpus Christi area compared to Sept. 8, and all measured levels were far below concentrations of health concern.

The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations measured on North Padre Island and at Dona Park monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area were somewhat higher than average, but both monitors showed decreases from Sept. 8 to 9. All concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations on Sept. 9 were slightly higher in Corpus Christi compared to Sept. 8, but were still typical for this time of year. Concentrations decreased at the ozone monitor in Victoria, compared to Sept. 8.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 11 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 11 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 35 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 9 and all monitored concentrations were far below levels of health concern. At the 3 monitors operating in the Texas City area, benzene concentrations were consistent with 2016 average concentrations for the area and were far below concentrations of health concern. 1,3-butadiene concentrations were higher than average, but were still more than 7000-times lower than concentrations of health concern. The 8 operating VOC monitors in Houston are primarily located in the industrial areas on the east side of the city, with several in the ship channel area. The maximum hourly concentrations for benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene on Sept. 9 were higher than is typical at most of the monitoring sites in Houston, but the highest measured benzene concentration was still 40-times lower than concentrations of possible health concern. The TCEQ monitor in Milby Park south of the Manchester neighborhood was repaired on Sept. 8 and produced 20 hours of data on Sept. 9. Concentrations of benzene and 1,3-butadiene at Milby Park, while slightly higher than average, were still very low (maximum hourly benzene concentration of 0.85 ppb) and far below concentrations of health concern. Hourly maximum 1,3-butadiene concentrations at the Cesar Chavez monitor (south of the ship channel) and at Channelview continue to decrease compared to the last week, and are well below concentrations of health concern.

Most hourly SO2 concentrations on Sept. 9 were in the typical range, and generally lower than concentrations measured on Sept. 8. There were slightly higher 1-hour peaks at several monitors in the area, but these and all other measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

Most 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations measured on Sept. 9 were in the typical range. PM2.5 concentrations near the Galveston airport, at the Aldine monitor in north central Houston, and at the Baytown monitor were higher than average, but still below concentrations of health concern. All the PM2.5 monitors in the Houston area showed either similar concentrations or decreases compared to Sept. 8.

Measured 8-hour maximum concentrations of ozone in Houston on Sept. 9 decreased from Sept. 8, and were typical for this time of year.

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Sept. 8, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 2 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 4 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 6 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: VOC monitors provided real-time data for a residential area in southern downtown Beaumont and at a school in Nederland, southeast of Beaumont. The measured VOC concentrations were very low and were far below concentrations of health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont-Port Arthur area were somewhat higher than those typically measured at these monitors, and were slightly higher in Port Arthur compared to Sept. 7. However, all measured concentrations of SO2 were still far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Beaumont and Mauriceville were somewhat higher than average. The Beaumont monitor had the same concentration compared to Sept. 7 and Mauriceville was slightly lower, but both were still well below concentrations of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations decreased somewhat compared to Sept. 7.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 4 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range at the monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area. The measured VOC concentrations were very low and were far below concentrations of health concern.

Hourly maximum SO2 concentrations decreased slightly at two monitors in the Corpus Christi area compared to Sept. 7, and all measured levels were far below concentrations of health concern.

The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations measured on North Padre Island and at Dona Park monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area were in the typical range, and both monitors showed increases from Sept. 7 to 8. All concentrations were well below levels of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations were typical for this time of year in the Corpus Christi area, and were slightly higher in Victoria, compared to Sept. 7.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 11 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 10 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 28 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 8 and all monitored concentrations were far below levels of health concern. At the 3 monitors operating in the Texas City area, benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations were consistent with 2016 average concentrations for the area, and were uniformly very low. The 8 operating VOC monitors in Houston are primarily located in the industrial areas on the east side of the city, with several in the ship channel area. The TCEQ monitor in Milby Park was repaired and began reporting data at 7pm on Sept. 8. The maximum hourly concentrations for benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene on Sept. 8 were higher than is typical at most of these sites, but the highest measured benzene concentration was still 50-times lower than concentrations of possible health concern. Hourly maximum 1,3-butadiene concentrations decreased at the Cesar Chavez monitor (south of the ship channel) compared to Sept. 7, and concentrations at Channelview for Sept. 7-8 were consistently lower than the prior five days. The maximum 1,3-butadiene concentrations measured throughout the Houston area were all well below concentrations of possible health concern.

Most hourly SO2 concentrations were in the typical range, although generally higher than concentrations measured on Sept. 7. There were slightly higher 1-hour peaks at several monitors in the area, but these and all other measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

Most measured 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations were in the typical range. PM2.5 concentrations at the Aldine monitor (in north central Houston), Baytown, Clinton Drive, and Park Place monitors in Houston were higher than average, but still below concentrations of health concern. While many of the PM2.5 monitors showed increased concentrations from Sept. 7 to 8, all 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Measured 8-hour maximum concentrations of ozone in Houston on Sept. 8 were slightly increased from Sept. 7, but were typical for this time of year

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Sept. 7, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 2 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 3 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 5 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: VOC monitors provided real-time data for a residential area in southern downtown Beaumont and at a school in Nederland, southeast of Beaumont. The measured VOC concentrations were very low and were far below concentrations of health concern.

Peak hourly SO2 concentrations measured in the Beaumont-Port Arthur area were somewhat higher than those typically measured at these monitors, and were increased from Sept. 6. However, all measured concentrations of SO2 were still far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations at the monitors in Beaumont and Mauriceville were somewhat higher than average, and had increased compared to Sept. 6, but were still below concentrations of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations had increased somewhat compared to Sept. 6, but were still in the typical concentration range for Beaumont for this time of year.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 4 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range at the monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area. The measured VOC concentrations were very low and were far below concentrations of health concern.

While hourly maximum SO2 concentrations increased slightly at two monitors in the Corpus Christi area compared to Sept. 6, all measured levels were still far below concentrations of health concern.

The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations measured on North Padre Island and at Dona Park monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area were in the typical range, and both monitors showed decreases from Sept. 6 to 7. All concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations were typical for this time of year in the Corpus Christi area, and were slightly higher in Victoria, compared to Sept. 6.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors:11 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 9 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 34 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 7 and all monitored concentrations were far below levels of health concern. At the 3 monitors operating in the Texas City area, benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations were consistent with 2016 average concentrations for the area, and were uniformly very low. The 7 operating VOC monitors in Houston are primarily located in the industrial areas on the east side of the city, with several in the ship channel area. One monitor (Danciger) is in a rural area southwest of the Greater Houston area. The maximum hourly concentrations for benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene on Sept. 7 were higher than is typical at most of these sites, but the highest measured benzene concentration was still 60-times lower than concentrations of possible health concern. Hourly maximum 1,3-butadiene concentrations were increased at the Cesar Chavez monitor (south of the ship channel) compared to Sept. 6, but the maximum concentration was still more than 300 times lower than concentrations of possible health concern.

Most hourly SO2 concentrations were in the typical range, although generally higher than concentrations measured on Sept. 6. There was one slightly higher 1-hour peak at the Park Place monitor (southeast Houston), but this and all other measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

Most measured 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations were in the typical range. PM2.5 concentrations at the Aldine monitor in north central Houston and the Park Place monitor in southeast Houston were higher than average, but still below concentrations of health concern. While many of the PM2.5 monitors showed increased concentrations from Sept. 6 to 7, all 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations were below levels of health concern.

Measured 8-hour maximum concentrations of ozone in Houston on Sept. 7 were slightly increased from Sept. 6, but were typical for this time of year.

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Sept. 6, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 2 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 3 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 5 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: VOC monitors provided real-time data for a residential area in southern downtown Beaumont and at a school in Nederland, southeast of Beaumont. The measured VOC concentrations were very low and were far below concentrations of health concern.

Hourly SO2 concentrations were in the typical range and were far below concentrations of health concern.

24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations were somewhat higher at the monitors in Beaumont and Mauriceville compared to Sept 6, but were still below concentrations of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations were typical for Beaumont for this time of year and lower than on Sept 5.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 1 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 4 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range at the monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area. There were a few hours with concentrations of benzene and 1,3-butadiene that were somewhat higher than normal, and these concentrations were higher than those seen on Sept. 5. However, the concentrations were still uniformly low and were far below (more than 500-times lower than) concentrations of health concern.

Hourly SO2 concentrations were in the typical range and were far below concentrations of health concern. SO2 concentrations at these monitors were decreased compared to Sept. 5.

While the 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations measured on North Padre Island increased from Sept. 5 to 6, they were still in the typical range and were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations were typical for this time of year in the Corpus Christi area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 11 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 10 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 8 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 33 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area on Sept. 6. From the 3 operating monitors in the Texas City area, benzene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations were average for the area, and were far below (more than 250-times lower than) concentrations of health concern. The 7 operating VOC monitors in Houston are primarily located in the industrial areas on the east side of the city, with several in the ship channel area. One monitor (Danciger) is in a rural area southwest of the Greater Houston area. The maximum hourly concentrations for benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene on Sept. 6 were higher than is typical at most of these sites, and they have mostly stayed the same or decreased from the concentrations measured on Sept. 5. The exception is styrene measured at the Channelview monitor (in east Houston north of I-10) where concentrations have gone up slightly since Sept. 5 but are still more than 2000-times lower than concentrations of potential health concern. All monitored VOC concentrations were far below concentrations of health concern.

Most hourly SO2 concentrations were in the typical range and were generally lower than concentrations measured on Sept. 5. There was one slightly higher 1 hour peak at the Park Place monitor (southeast Houston), but this and all other measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

Most measured 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations were in the typical range. PM2.5 concentrations at the monitor on Galveston Island, and at the Aldine monitor in north central Houston were higher than average, but still below concentrations of health concern. Twenty-four-hour concentrations of PM2.5 in Conroe (located North of Houston at an airport) have decreased drastically since Labor Day weekend, and are now typical for this area. While many of the PM2.5 monitors showed increased concentrations from Sept. 5 to 6, all 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations are below levels of health concern.

Measured 8-hour maximum concentrations of ozone in Houston on Sept. 6 were low-to-typical for this time of year, and have decreased from Sept. 5.

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Sept. 5, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 2 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 5 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: One VOC monitor was providing real-time data for a residential area in southern Beaumont for 6 hours on Sept. 5, and the VOC concentrations were very low and were far below concentrations of health concern.

Hourly SO2 concentrations were in the typical range.

All 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations measured in Beaumont and Mauriceville were in the typical range, and were below concentrations of health concern.

On Sept. 5 measured ozone concentrations were typical for Beaumont for this time of year.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 1 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 5 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range at the monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area. While there were a few hours with concentrations of benzene and 1,3-butadiene somewhat higher than normal, the concentrations were still uniformly low and were far below concentrations of health concern.

Most hourly SO2 concentrations were in the typical range. Higher than normal hourly SO2 concentrations were measured briefly at Corpus Christi West (in southwest Corpus Christi), but these and all other measured concentrations of SO2 were still very low and well below concentrations of health concern.

The 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations measured on North Padre Island were in the typical range, and were below concentrations of health concern.

Measured ozone concentrations were typical-to-low for this time of year in the Corpus Christi area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 10 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 10 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 7 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 31 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area. From the 3 operating monitors in the Texas City area, there were short 1 hour spikes of benzene and 1,3-butadiene above normal concentrations for the area, but these were still far below concentrations of health concern. The 7 operating VOC monitors in Houston were primarily located in the industrial areas on the east side of the city, with several in the ship channel area. The maximum hourly concentrations for benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene were higher than is typical at most of these sites, although they have mostly decreased from the concentrations measured over the Labor day weekend. The exception is the Channelview monitor (in east Houston north of I-10) where concentrations have gone up slightly since Sept. 4. However, all monitored VOC concentrations were far below concentrations of health concern.

Most hourly SO2 concentrations were in the typical range. There was one slightly higher 1 hour peak at the Houston Croquet monitor (southwest Houston), but this and all other measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

Most measured 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations were in the typical range, and have generally been decreasing since the Labor Day weekend. 24-hour concentrations of PM2.5 in Conroe (located North of Houston at an airport) have been higher than usual for that site, but have decreased since Sept 4. All 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations are below levels of health concern.

Measured 8-hour maximum concentrations of ozone in Houston on Sept. 5 were typical for this time of year, and have decreased from Sept. 4.

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Sept. 2-4, 2017

Beaumont:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 5 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly SO2 concentrations were in the typical range. Higher than normal hourly SO2 concentrations were measured at Beaumont Downtown and Port Arthur 7th Street when the monitors first started measurements on Sept 2, but decreased rapidly. All measured concentrations of SO2 were well below concentrations of health concern.

On Sept. 2 measured ozone concentrations at a single monitor were somewhat higher than usual for the Beaumont area for this time of year, but concentrations decreased on Sept. 3 and 4. The ozone concentrations over the Labor Day weekend appear to be primarily caused by weather patterns favoring ozone formation, with increased incoming background levels associated with Harvey moving inland and away from Southeast Texas.

Corpus Christi:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 1 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 1 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 5 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range. At the monitor in the Corpus Christi Refinery Row area, while there were a few hours with concentrations of benzene, 1,3-butadiene and styrene somewhat higher than normal, the concentrations were uniformly low and were far below concentrations of health concern.

Most hourly SO2 concentrations were in the typical range. Higher than normal hourly SO2 concentrations were measured briefly at Corpus Christi Tuloso and Corpus Christi West, but these and all other measured concentrations of SO2 were still very low and well below concentrations of health concern.

Only 8 hours of hourly PM2.5 data was available at one monitor on North Padre Island, and all concentrations were in the typical range and well below concentrations of health concern. Measured ozone concentrations were typical-to-low for this time of year in the Corpus Christi area.

Houston:

Total Operational Real-Time Monitors: 10 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs); 6 for sulfur dioxide (SO2); 7 for particulate matter (PM2.5); 28 for ozone.

Air Quality Summary: Most hourly VOC concentrations were in the typical range in the Houston-Galveston area. From the 3 operating monitors in the Texas City area, there were short 1 hour spikes of benzene and 1,3-butadiene above normal concentrations for the area, but these were still far below concentrations of health concern. The 7 operating VOC monitors in Houston were primarily located in the industrial areas on the east side of the city, with several in the ship channel area. The maximum hourly concentrations for benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and styrene were higher than is typical at most of these sites. However, these high concentrations were not sustained at any site for very long, and were all far below concentrations of health concern.

Most hourly SO2 concentrations were in the typical range. Higher than normal hourly SO2 concentrations were measured briefly (typically for 1-3 hours) at all monitoring sites in Houston, but these and all other measured concentrations of SO2 were still very low, and well below concentrations of health concern.

Most measured 24-hour PM2.5 concentrations were in the typical range. Higher than normal concentrations were measured for short periods of time at Clinton drive on the Houston ship channel, and at Park Place and Seabrook Friendship Park on the South East side of Houston, but all of these concentrations were decreasing as of Sept 4, and were still below concentrations of health concern. 24-hour concentrations of PM2.5 in Conroe (located North of Houston at an airport) have been higher than usual for that site and have been slowly increasing since Thurs. Aug. 31. These concentrations are still below levels of health concern, and may be attributable to increased hurricane-related ground- and air-vehicle activity at the Conroe Airport.

On Sept 1, Houston measured a high ozone reading at a single monitor located on the west side of Houston, but the 23 other operating monitors showed typical ozone concentrations for this time of year. This is not an unusually high concentration for the Houston area in summer, and was sustained for a single day, before dropping back to normal concentrations. The ozone concentrations over the Labor Day weekend appear to be primarily caused by weather patterns favoring ozone formation, with increased incoming background levels associated with Harvey moving inland and away from Southeast Texas.

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